Unexplored 2: The Wayfarer's Legacy is Already Incredibly Ambitious

Although it helps to add replayability and a real sense of ownership over your decisions, it also becomes very hard to keep you constantly engaged.

Seeing the same tree or forked path in subsequent runs starts to ruin a little of that illusion, even if the much broader gameplay makes that illusion worth breaking.

To put it simply, Unexplored 2: The Wayfarers Legacy is a procedurally generated open-world RPG roguelike that tasks you with destroying a mysterious staff and staying alive long enough to do it.

It does this in a few central ways.The risk/reward system clearly inspired by tabletop RPGs adds a certain flair to each encounter, having you climb up passages, decipher riddles, or much more.

Instead of failing to pick that lock, you may reshuffle the pile you pick from and add a few more victories in there for good luck.

You can choose to make a camp to heal up or gain new skills but doing so might slow you down and make you just a little closer to getting caught up with.

You can choose to light your fire to heat up food for a better regen but doing so might leave you much easier to spot in the cold of the night air.

There was a moment early on where I walked into a small town only for everyone to run away from me.

I was worried I’d have to pass some skill check to avoid a tough battle or run away but it turned out I was the bad guy here.

People were sprinting in terror, only to hear one brave innkeeper walk up to me and say “put away the sword and we’ll talk”.

It certainly isn’t bad but - off the back of interesting puzzles and charming systems - it ends up feeling a little half-baked in the grand scheme.

It certainly tries to shake it up with weapons you can pick up as loot and different ways to play around with combat but it is one of the least interesting parts of Unexplored 2’s design.

This all being said, even the combat tries to fit into this risk-reward system - having the magic staff you are aiming to destroy also works as a conduit for magic.

Coming out of the dark dungeons into the land above has given Unexplored depth and the ultimate ability to be so much more than its predecessor.

Unexplored 2 feels like the studio coming into their own and if they just keep coming, this could be one of the best games of the year.

5 months ago by Masoumeh Shafiei
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